• Make sure your body has enough calories to ‘fuel’ and ‘refuel’ your daily exercise. It is very difficult to know what is needed, so it is advised to get advice from a sports nutritionist to design a balanced and healthy nutrition plan
  • Keep a journal of your exercise practices, nutrition and menstrual cycle
  • Your menstrual cycle is a good indicator of health. If your period disappears for three or more consecutive cycles, consult your GP and ask them to recommend a specialist (e.g., endocrinologist, nutritionist) for further advice
  • Try to listen to your family or friends if they express concerns about excessive weight loss, or disciplined exercise regimes. Sometimes family and friends see things you don’t, and most often they are expressing their concerns because they love you
  • If you think you have disordered eating behaviours or body image issues, don’t be afraid to seek advice and support from a psychologist or councellor
  • While exercising and dieting might be important for maintaining or achieving the body you want today, try to think about the long-term health of your bones and reproductive system. Ask yourself, do you still want to be able to walk, run, or dance, well into your old age? Might you want children one day?